Alex McGough Jersey

After the Seattle Seahawks lost the Wild Card Playoff game to the Dallas Cowboys, nine of ten members on the practice squad signed future contracts with the Seahawks, setting up their return to the team for training camp in July. The tenth member of the practice squad, and the lone member not to sign a future contract was 2018 seventh round draft pick, quarterback Alex McGough.

I won’t waste time pointing out that the dots were not difficult to connect in this situation, and on Tuesday we finally learned why McGough was not on the list of Seahawks practice squad players set to return in 2019.

The important part of that tweet is that McGough signed with the Jacksonville Jaguars, so is set to go to training camp with them next summer. The part about Seattle waiving McGough is technically incorrect, but the end result is the same, as McGough is no longer an employee of the Seahawks.

Now, before anybody bothers to ask how a 2018 draft pick of the team who spent the season on the practice squad can go sign with another team, the answer is simple. The day after the season ends for teams the practice squad for that team is dissolved, and all members of the squad become unrestricted free agents free to sign with any team. Because most practice squad players are on a practice squad because no other team felt the need to claim them off waivers, the overwhelming majority of players sign a future contract with their practice squad team for the next season.

However, on occasion, as was seen here, and as was also seen in the case of former Seahawk Isaiah Battle it does happen that players will take advantage of their free agent status and sign elsewhere. In the case of Battle, after having spent 2016 on the practice squad for the Los Angeles Rams, Battle signed with the Kansas City Chiefs prior to the 2017 season. Then, in a Madden-esque maneuver, the Chiefs flipped Battle to the Seahawks for a conditional draft pick at the end of training camp.

In any case, best of luck to McGough in Jacksonville, where he should immediately become a part of the conversation when it comes to who the starting quarterback will be for the Jaguars in 2019.

Rasheem Green Jersey

With Frank Clark heading to the Kansas City Chiefs, the Seattle Seahawks are left with an additional draft pick, nearly $17 million in additional salary cap space and virtually no experienced edge rushers on their roster.

While the team is certainly going to use the extra pick, the extra money or both to add to their pass rush, the trade does open up an opportunity for two 2018 draft picks — Rasheem Green and Jacob Martin — to step into bigger roles next season.

Green was Seattle’s third-round pick last year out of USC. The soon-to-be 22-year-old played in 10 games for the Seahawks as a rotational defensive end, picking up one sack and seven solo tackles.

Martin was Seattle’s sixth-round selection. A hybrid edge rusher, Martin impressed with his high motor and excellent speed off the edge, racking up three sacks and eight quarterback hits while appearing in all 16 games. Martin’s performance prompted coach Pete Carroll to say he will get more use as a pass rusher next season.

Both Green and Martin will be expected to step up into bigger roles next year regardless of what other moves Seattle makes on the defensive line.

Richard Sherman Jersey

Richard Sherman, Doug Baldwin, 49ers, Seahawks

Richard Sherman played together at Stanford, then won a Super Bowl as members of the Seattle Seahawks. After Baldwin announced his retirement, Sherman, the now-San Francisco 49ers cornerback took time to honor his former teammate.

The Seahawks released Baldwin and Kam Chancellor on Thursday after failed physicals, but that doesn’t take away from their status as franchise legends.

Baldwin was a two-time Pro Bowler and helped the team win a Super Bowl during the 2013 season. He spent his entire career with the Seahawks and finished with 493 catches for 6,563 yards and 49 touchdowns.

“These are two of the most iconic players in franchise history and both were instrumental in establishing our championship culture, great examples of competitiveness and leadership on the field and in the community,” Seahawks general manager John Schneider said in a statement. “These legendary players will always be a part of our Seahawks family.”

Baldwin and Sherman were teammates at Stanford from 2007 through 2010, winning an Orange Bowl on a team that included Andrew Luck in their final collegiate season.

Baldwin is well-known by Sherman’s current team. During his career, Baldwin terrorized San Francisco secondaries, including during the heydays of the rivalry earlier this decade when the two combined for five straight NFC West titles.

Richard Sherman played together at Stanford, then won a Super Bowl as members of the Seattle Seahawks. After Baldwin announced his retirement, Sherman, the now-San Francisco 49ers cornerback took time to honor his former teammate.
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The Seahawks released Baldwin and Kam Chancellor on Thursday after failed physicals, but that doesn’t take away from their status as franchise legends.

Baldwin was a two-time Pro Bowler and helped the team win a Super Bowl during the 2013 season. He spent his entire career with the Seahawks and finished with 493 catches for 6,563 yards and 49 touchdowns.

“These are two of the most iconic players in franchise history and both were instrumental in establishing our championship culture, great examples of competitiveness and leadership on the field and in the community,” Seahawks general manager John Schneider said in a statement. “These legendary players will always be a part of our Seahawks family.”

Baldwin and Sherman were teammates at Stanford from 2007 through 2010, winning an Orange Bowl on a team that included Andrew Luck in their final collegiate season.

Baldwin is well-known by Sherman’s current team. During his career, Baldwin terrorized San Francisco secondaries, including during the heydays of the rivalry earlier this decade when the two combined for five straight NFC West titles.

However, with both Baldwin retired Chancellor appearing headed that way as well, Earl Thomas signing in Baltimore, and Richard Sherman now playing cornerback for San Francisco, it’s officially a new era in the 49ers-Seahawks rivalry.

Patrick Kerney Jersey

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New England Patriots wide receiver Chris Hogan is not the only NFL player with lacrosse-playing roots. Philadelphia Eagles defensive end Chris Long also will make his second consecutive trip to the Super Bowl this week.

I first became aware of Chris when he and my son played on the same Pop Warner football team soon after we moved to Charlottesville. Chris also played lacrosse as a student at St Anne’s-Belfield (Va.). UVA recruit James King also was on that St Anne’s team, and I saw them play a few times in their senior spring.

The truth is, I am not sure I ever saw a ball actually in Chris’ stick during all that time, but he sure was fun to track when the ball was on the ground. There may have been as many penalties as goals scored in many of those games. There were many skeptics about his college football potential, but he was a dynamo in the weight room. Presently, it is his courage on social justice issues and humanitarian efforts that truly distinguish these later years of his career.

Before Chris Long, there was another UVA defensive end that traveled a very different early path but also had a long, decorated NFL career. I arrived at the New England Top 150 Lacrosse Camp at Williams College for a short visit in the summer of 1994. Upon arrival, one of the coaches mentioned that there was a camper who wanted to talk with me, and I was happy to oblige.

As the following session drew to a close, a young man came across the field while blotting out the sun. He stuck out his hand and said, “Coach Starsia, my name is Patrick Kerney and I would like to talk with you about the University of Virginia.”

A young man came across the field while blotting out the sun. He stuck out his hand and said, “Coach Starsia, my name is Patrick Kerney and I would like to talk with you about the University of Virginia.”

M

y response to this 6-foot-6, 230-pound specimen, with the old white arm pads and biceps bulging through the straps, was simply, “Son, I have no idea who you are, but we are very interested in talking with you about the University of Virginia.”

I came to find out that Patrick wrestled and played football and lacrosse at the Taft School in Connecticut.

It was always a bit of an oversimplification to say that I just looked for athletes in recruiting, but I was looking for guys who thought they could play football at Virginia. Some were close, like Mark Farnham, Brett Hughes, Steve Holmes and Chris LaPierre. Others were football players in lacrosse players’ bodies, like Darren Muller, Ryan Curtis and Walt Cataldo. A couple had the tools but not the temperament, like Rhamel and Shamel Bratton.

And only one was actually a much better college football player than he ever would have been a lacrosse player. Patrick Kerney was just too big for us and wound up better suited rushing the passer than covering some small, quick college middie.

Early in recruiting, Patrick asked for permission to walk on the football team at UVA. I had a number of these requests over the years and always said yes. You come to college, you need to make some of these decisions for yourself and in every prior case, the players would last 3-4 days at practice before realizing that a walk-on lacrosse player was not going to be handed the ball in a scrimmage nor be allowed to tackle one of the returning veterans.

With Patrick in mind, I went to the football coaches and told them, “I won’t pretend to tell you your business, but I may have one here.” They looked at me like I had two heads, with an expression of, “Yeah, right.” Film of Patrick’s senior year at Taft was very inconclusive because of the quality of play and he missed most of the year with an injured knee.

Recruited walk-ons in football are invited to the start of practice in early August. Others do not see the field until the start of school in September. I talked the coaches into giving Patrick a shot in August, but anticipated that he might have been in my office a week later having had enough of all that. Instead, it was the head football coach, George Welsh, who informed me shortly thereafter that Patrick might be “the best freshman in the class.”

A mere two weeks later, Patrick was one of the few true freshmen to participate in Virginia’s 1995 season opener at Michigan. He went from classes on a Saturday morning and a crowd of about 300 at the Taft homecoming to 108,000 and a game decided on the very last play in the Big House in less than a year.

Patrick enrolled at Virginia on the smallest scholarship we are allowed to provide someone designated as a scholarship athlete. He lettered that fall and the football coach told him that he was expected at spring practice. When Patrick told Coach Welsh he came to Virginia to play lacrosse, Welsh told me that he respected Patrick even more for sticking to his guns.

Patrick lettered in lacrosse that spring for a team that lost in overtime of the NCAA championship game. We would joke that Patrick, with his imposing physical presence, was always going to be the first off the bus when we arrived at a visitor’s site, and I remember walking Coach Pressler over to the practice field just to look at Patrick the day before our game with Duke.

Following that first year, football put Patrick on a full scholarship and it was not a request for him to participate in spring football in his second year. Patrick came back out to lacrosse after spring practice in 1997.

Those few weeks in ’97 were the end of Patrick’s college lacrosse career. He began to realize his potential in football and needed to eat, lift and put on weight. Like Chris Long, Patrick burned white hot in the weight room. He went from 240 to 255 pounds between his second and third years and was almost 270 as a senior. He also worked our lacrosse camp during summers, and I am sure his standing outside the camp store and charging campers to hang from his arms was some sort of NCAA violation.

Cortez Kennedy Jersey

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Thursday is perhaps a somber one for the Seattle Seahawks as Aug. 23, 2018, would have been Hall of Fame defensive tackle Cortez Kennedy’s 50th birthday.

The Seahawks legend passed away unexpectedly in May of 2017 due to complications from heart disease, pneumonia and diabetes.

It is inarguable that Kennedy was not just one of the greatest Seahawks of all time, but one of the best athletes in all of Seattle sports history. Kennedy was enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame in the summer of 2012 and had his jersey retired by the Seahawks during a 24-23 upset victory over the New England Patriots.

Kennedy is only the second Seahawk to ever win Defensive Player of the Year, following fellow Hall of Fame defender Kenny Easley. During Kennedy’s 1992 campaign of terror, he logged 14 sacks and 92 tackles. Kennedy was the only bright spot on a 2-14 Seattle team that season.

Kennedy finished his career with 58 sacks, 568 solo tackles, 11 forced fumbles and three interceptions in his 11-years in the Pacific Northwest. He is joined by Kenny Easley, Walter Jones and Steve Largent as the only Seahawks to have their jersey retired as Hall of Fame Players.

Steve Largent Jersey

Former Seahawk Steve Largent greets Concrete students

CONCRETE — Former Seattle Seahawks wide receiver Steve Largent recalled Friday a 1986 game against the Denver Broncos in which he thought he had recovered a fumble — only to learn the ball he recovered was actually a stray let loose from the sidelines.

That was the play he wanted Concrete High School students to remember during his visit to the school.

“Aim your life in such a direction that you don’t fall on the wrong ball,” he told the students.

Largent was in Concrete to celebrate the Boys & Girls Clubs of Skagit County’s new club, which opened thanks to a $1.6 million federal grant.

The Pro Football Hall of Famer told the students that when he was in eighth grade, he joined what was then the Boys Club in Albany, Georgia.

“I loved it,” Largent said. “It really meant a lot to me. That was one of the things that was a real positive in my life.”

Especially in his early teens, Largent said, he needed something positive.

“It was a formative age for me,” he said. “I don’t know how things would have turned out if I had not had a positive organization like the Boys & Girls Clubs.”

Largent said his parents divorced when he was 6, and his mother later married a man who was an alcoholic. Largent’s tumultuous home life left him searching for a place where he felt he belonged.

That’s what he found at the club, he said.

“The sense of belonging there was really helpful to me,” Largent said. “Some of these kids are just looking for some friends and someone to hang out with, and to do it in a constructive way. That’s where the Boys & Girls Clubs come in.”

Since the Concrete club opened Oct. 1, at least 110 kids have enrolled, said Boys & Girls Clubs of Skagit County Executive Director Ron McHenry.

That’s about 20 percent of the school district’s enrollment, Concrete School District Superintendent Wayne Barrett said.

“I’d still like that to be higher,” Barrett said. “It’s just a great opportunity for us to have positive adults with our students.”

The school district’s partnership with the club will hopefully allow all the involved parties to better serve kids, he said.

“We provide additional support in the school district’s strategic plan to be able to create positive change in the lives of youth,” McHenry said.

Kids who attend the Boys & Girls club receive free dinner and are taken home by bus.

While the district already supports a free community meal once a month, the club intends to also host one, as well as a monthly family day for members, McHenry said.

Before assisting in cutting the ribbon to the new club, Largent took questions from students, including one about preparing for their upcoming football game.

“If you have an aggressive defensive front seven, you can win the game,” Largent said. “You need to get a lot of turnovers and not give them up.”

He also talked about teamwork, camaraderie and selflessness.

“All those things are absolutely vital to everything they’re going to do in life,” Largent said.

At the elementary school, club members surprised Largent, a former congressman from Oklahoma, by making their own campaign slogans.

“Let’s bring our country together,” was sixth-grader Hunter Throssel’s slogan.

“Right now, our country’s kind of spread apart,” Hunter said. “(Being together) makes us a better country.”

Largent said it’s never too soon to incorporate civics into everyday life.

“To me, the greatest civics lesson is, ‘Do unto others what you would have them do to you,’” he said.

Shaun Alexander Jersey

Round-Up_4.25.19

Good afternoon, 12s.

Here’s a look at what’s ‘out there’ for today – Thursday, April 25 – about your Seattle Seahawks:
Eat. Drink. Change Lives.

On the eve of the 2019 NFL Draft, Seahawks Legend Shaun Alexander co-hosted a pop-up dinner event in Nashville, Tennessee. Alexander joined forces with Café Momentum, a Dallas non-profit restaurant and culinary training program that provides opportunities for young men and women in the juvenile system to start fresh and learn new skills.

The event hosted other NFL Legends and local Nashville influencers to come together in order to raise awareness and advocate for juvenile offenders. The guests were treated with a three-course dinner from Café Momentum’s team of award-winning chefs. A group of young men currently in the Nashville juvenile justice system trained with Café Momentum and NFL Legends a few days prior to the event to help prepare and serve dinner.

Alexander also made a point to educate the youths of his time with the Seattle Seahawks. He elaborated on his NFL career and even noted that he was on the cover of Madden 2007.

19 years ago, Alexander was selected in the first round of the 2000 NFL Draft at pick no. 19 overall. This year the Seahawks Legend will be announcing the Seahawks’ pick in the second round of the 2019 NFL Draft. Seahawks safety Kam Chancellor will also be announcing the team’s pick in the third round.
Social Post Of The Day

Today’s ‘Social Post of the Day’ comes from the official Twitter account of the University of Texas Football Team, as they highlight Texas alumnus and Seahawks punter Michael Dickson getting drafted in 2018.

Marshawn Lynch Jersey

Amid the hype and fanfare of the NFL draft, football folk hero Marshawn Lynch did the most Marshawn Lynch thing of all: slipped out the back door when no one was looking.

Lynch announced his retirement last week, at exactly the time when the NFL world was least equipped to deal with it … which almost surely wasn’t a coincidence. Lynch was always the NFL’s equivalent of a pop-up storm, materializing and then vaporizing before you’d even realized he was there.

Lynch is a key figure in two of the most famous plays in NFL history, plays we’ll be discussing 50 years from now. So with that in mind, it’s time to start talking legacy. A simple question: Does Marshawn Lynch’s story end in the Hall of Fame?
Marshawn by the numbers

Let’s break this down. Lynch’s 10,379 career rushing yards rank 29th all-time, and his 2,441 attempts rank 26th. There are 32 running backs already in the Hall of Fame. But career numbers don’t tell the whole story; retired players on the career yardage list ahead of Lynch include Edgerrin James, Fred Taylor, Steven Jackson, Corey Dillon, Warrick Dunn, Ricky Watters, Jamal Lewis, Thomas Jones, Tiki Barber and Eddie George. Star-level backs, all of them, some among the best of their era … but will they all end up in the Hall? Unlikely.

Breaking in Lynch’s favor is the fact that his 2011-14 seasons rank among the best quartet any running back has ever produced. He was a Pro Bowler all four years and a first-team All-Pro in 2012. He led the league in rushing touchdowns in 2013 and 2014. His Seahawks went to the playoffs in three of those four years, won a ring in 2013, and came this close in 2014. (More on that debacle later.)

The knock on Lynch, of course, is that those four years comprise pretty much the entirety of his star-level output. He was reasonably productive in Buffalo — Marshawn Lynch once played for the Bills, remember that? — and less so in chunks of two seasons with Oakland. He walked away from the game entirely in 2016, leaving his age-30 year on the table. He still gobbled up yards like Skittles every time he touched the ball, averaging more than four yards a carry right on into retirement, but those carries shrunk every game.

Let the record show that Lynch’s final game came against, of all teams, Seattle. The Raiders lost in a blowout, 27-3, and Lynch’s final play was a five-yard run right up the middle. Of course.

K. J. Wright Jersey

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April 19, 2019 at 6:05 pm
Seahawks LB K.J. Wright will return to Seattle in 2019. (AP)

Seahawks’ linebacker K.J. Wright entered free agency for the first time in his eight year career in March — but fortunately for both Wright and the Seahawks, that trip didn’t last long. Wright joined Danny, Dave and Moore on 710 ESPN Seattle Friday to talk about what it felt like to be a free agent, his decision to re-sign with Seattle, and what it was like to have his best performance of an injury-plagued season in the playoffs.

Clayton: What we learned about the Seahawks this week

“It did feel like I left, and that whole stretch from January to March, I kind of separated myself, because I was like, ‘It may not happen,’” Wright said of free agency. “But I’m back in the building and they found a way to make me happy…

The linebacker signed a two-year, $15.5 million deal with Seattle one day day after the start of free agency. Wright was originally drafted by the Seahawks in the fourth round of the 2011 NFL Draft, making him one of Seattle’s longest-tenured players (in addition to wide receiver Doug Baldwin).

“It was interesting. I believe it’s good for each player to have an opportunity to just test it (free agency) and see what’s out there,” he said. “It didn’t let me down; it would have been great if I wasn’t coming off of injury, but things happen and it is what it is.”

April 19, 2019 at 6:05 pm
Seahawks LB K.J. Wright will return to Seattle in 2019. (AP)

Seahawks’ linebacker K.J. Wright entered free agency for the first time in his eight year career in March — but fortunately for both Wright and the Seahawks, that trip didn’t last long. Wright joined Danny, Dave and Moore on 710 ESPN Seattle Friday to talk about what it felt like to be a free agent, his decision to re-sign with Seattle, and what it was like to have his best performance of an injury-plagued season in the playoffs.

Clayton: What we learned about the Seahawks this week

“It did feel like I left, and that whole stretch from January to March, I kind of separated myself, because I was like, ‘It may not happen,’” Wright said of free agency. “But I’m back in the building and they found a way to make me happy…

The linebacker signed a two-year, $15.5 million deal with Seattle one day day after the start of free agency. Wright was originally drafted by the Seahawks in the fourth round of the 2011 NFL Draft, making him one of Seattle’s longest-tenured players (in addition to wide receiver Doug Baldwin).

“It was interesting. I believe it’s good for each player to have an opportunity to just test it (free agency) and see what’s out there,” he said. “It didn’t let me down; it would have been great if I wasn’t coming off of injury, but things happen and it is what it is.”

A knee injury sidelined the 29-year-old Wright for a large part of the season. He appeared in just five games in 2018 (after missing a total of five starts over the previous seven years) but told Danny, Dave and Moore he felt good about ending the season with a strong performance against the Dallas Cowboys in the wild card round of the playoffs. Wright had eight tackles and his first interception of the season in that contest.

“To play in that type of game, with the season that I had just battling injuries, that was really good for me personally,” Wright said. “I’m thankful that I could end the season on a good note.”

Listen to Wright’s full interview in the audio clip embedded above or on Danny, Dave and Moore’s podcast page.

Justin Britt Jersey

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The Seahawks went 10-6 last season and made the playoffs for the sixth time in seven years with Russell Wilson under center. And now that Wilson is under contract for four more years (and with $107 million guaranteed), this team is poised to do more than qualify for the postseason but become regulars in the Super Bowl.

This certainly seemed like Seattle’s destiny as recently as 2014, but an ill-timed play call and the subsequent dissolution of the Legion of Boom saw other NFC teams represent the conference in the sport’s biggest game. The Seahawks have had a good offseason but with a few key moves could catapult themselves from playoff team to likely Super Bowl representative.

Here’s how:

  1. Sign an edge rusher

A week before the draft the Seahawks traded Frank Clark and his 13 sacks in ’18 to the Chiefs for Kansas City’s 2019 first-rounder and its 2020 second-rounder. And while the team drafted TCU’s L.J. Collier in Round 1, he’s not a like-for-like replacement for Clark. Collier, who did had 11.5 sacks as a senior, isn’t a pure pass rusher. In fact, his heavy hands make him much better at setting the edge and he’s already drawing comparisons to Michael Bennett.

In fact, coach Pete Carroll says Collier will play in Bennett’s role at defensive end in the base defense and move inside on passing downs.

“I think that’s a great comparison (to Bennett) because he can play outside and he can play in,” Collier said during the team’s rookie minicamp, via the Seattle Times’ Bob Condotta. “He’s a tough, hard-nosed guy. He loves to hit people. I like his style of play and his flexibility of going in and out. Obviously I can do that, too. That’s where I see the comparison.”

Carroll added: “He has a style of his play that I was attracted to right off the bat. He plays with really good leverage and really long arms and he uses his hands really well. And you could see it in the walk through even, just in his position and he has a sense for that. That’s a special characteristic that he already has. So technique-wise, he’s been coached very well also, and there’s stuff that we can do with him. I think he’s going to be a really exciting guy for us to fit into the scheme.”

Put another way, Collier isn’t Clark.

And while he has the ability to rush the passer, the Seahawks could target a situational player, several of whom remain available free agents. At the top of the list: Ziggy Ansah, who spent his first six NFL seasons with the Lions where he registered 48 sacks, including 12 in 2017 and 14.5 in 2015. Ansah has battled injuries — he played in just seven games last season and managed four sacks — but he’s a terror when he’s healthy. And in Seattle he could be used in passing situations to limit his wear-and-tear and maximize his effectiveness, all while having Collier wreaking havoc from the interior. Ansah probably won’t come cheap but his price will continue to fall as we move away from the draft and training camp approaches. Added bonus: Seattle has $11.5 million in available cap space (10th best in the league), according to Spotrac.

  1. Find a reliable intermediate target

Based on a couple days of rookie minicamp the Seahawks are extremely pleased with their decision to trade up into Round 2 and grab wide receiver D.K. Metcalf, who was the No. 1 wideout on our board and a first-round talent who fell all the way to 64 because of concerns about his durability and route-running ability. Metcalf assuaged many of those concerns at minicamp though he was running routes in shorts and a t-shirt — and against air — but if nothing else it was a good start. Carroll couldn’t hide his excitement.

“I mean, he’s big and he’s fast,” the coach told USAToday.com’s Doug Farrar after the first day of rookie minicamp. “He’s got really good feet, you know, and his catching range was exhibited today. And you know, we’ve got to figure it out, figure out where it is, maybe even more unique than we thought coming in. So, we just develop it as we go. But big and really fast and the catching range was really obvious today.”

More good news: Seattle’s offense is built around the run, and that starts with Wilson, Chris Carson and last year’s first-rounder, Rashaad Penny. And that sets up the play-action passing game which, again, starts with Wilson. Tyler Lockett was one of the league’s best deep threats a season ago and now he’ll be joined by Metcalf, who ran a 4.33 40 at the combine and at 6-4 is six inches taller than Lockett.

But there’s also the short and intermediate passing game where Doug Baldwin has long been Wilson’s security blanket. Except that Baldwin, who is 30, could be facing retirement because of the accumulation of surgeries resulting from various football injuries. The Seahawks drafted slot receiver Gary Jennings in the fourth round but he didn’t take part in minicamp because of a hamstring injury. Even still, he’s a rookie who struggled with dropped passes while at West Virginia. It’s unfair to expect him to seamlessly fill in for Baldwin.

Which is why Seattle could sign a veteran possession receiver to patrol those short and intermediate areas. Pierre Garcon is 33 years old and he’s played in just eight games the last two seasons. But in 16 appearances in 2016 he had 79 catches for 1,041 yards. And Michael Crabtree, 31, had 54 receptions for 607 yards in the Ravens’ run-heavy offense last season.

  1. Add depth at right tackle

Germain Ifedi is who he is. And that is a replacement level right tackle. The Seahawks and Wilson have shown that an offense can survive with something less than a Pro Bowl cast of blockers. The unit was 12th in run blocking a season ago, via Football Outsiders’ metrics, but they fell to 30th in pass protection. And with the addition of Metcalf and Jennings, it stands to reason that Seattle could take more shots downfield. This also means keeping Wilson upright. The team added guard Mike Iupati and re-signed guard D.J. Fluker, and they’ll join left tackle Duane Brown, center Justin Britt and the aforementioned right tackle, Ifedi, the team’s 2016 first-rounder.

Ifedi’s 2018 Pro Football Focus grade — 55.6 — ranked 71st among all tackles. The good news: He improved from his first two seasons. The bad news: Those improvements have been incremental; he graded out at 52.0 in ’16 and 51.7 in ’17. This explains in part why the Seahawks declined to exercise Ifedi’s fifth-year option, which would have paid him $10.35 million in 2020.

“Well, there’s there’s a lot of factors,” Carroll told reporters on Friday. “You know, we’re in the midst of trying to continue to fit the roster together and all of that, and the big demands, sometimes we can jump on it, sometimes we can’t. We love Germain. He’s grown with us. He’s become a solid football player and done a great job, starting a ton of games for us and hanging in there and being tough about it, and we’d love to have him. This is not an indication of anything, but we like the guy and we hope he’ll be with us for a long time.”

The Seahawks drafted offensive guard Phil Haynes in the fourth round but depth remains an issue behind Ifedi. It’s why the team should think about signing Donald Penn. Yes, he’s 36 and missed 12 games last season, but he was a reliable cog in the Raiders’ O-lines that ranked seventh in pass protection and 11th in run blocking in 2017, a was even more dominant during the team’s 12-win 2016 campaign (No. 1 in pass protection, 11th in run blocking).

The Seahawks are better now than they were in the playoff loss to the Cowboys. The question is: Are they good enough, as currently constituted, to match up against the NFC’s top outfits. Addressing the needs mentioned above won’t magically put them in the Super Bowl but it will give them much-needed depth at key positions and could possibly take them from fringe Super Bowl contender to one legit threat to win the conference.